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Horse Care

Q: I own a 20-year-old Welsh Pony that recently had laminitis. She’s fine now, but the vet says she can’t have much sugar. My pony loves treats though, and I was wondering if you know of any substitutes. A: This...
Young equestrian with horse in a blanket

Horse Blanketing Guide

Most healthy horses can survive winter with just their own fuzzy coat. However, when cold, snowy, windy or wet weather sets in, a blanket offers a little extra protection for horses that need it. If your horse is elderly, has...
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Find Your Old Friend

Despite our best efforts, it’s all too easy to lose track of a favorite horse. They’re bought and sold, names are changed, and new owners may not always update the registration information. Since the beginning of social media, horse owners...
Thumbs up Supporting digestion this winter The challenges of winter horsekeeping can wreak havoc on your horse’s hindgut. For digestive care and the peace of mind of ColiCare™, support your horse with one of our six ColiCare eligible supplements. Thumbs down Causing digestive...
This article was originally published on September 10, 2015 The days are most definitely getting shorter and the mornings are a bit cooler; your horse has probably already begun growing in a bit of his winter coat. The time to...
After a family crisis, Ken Chin became the owner of a dozen high-profile Arabian performance horses. At the time, Chin knew very little about horses in general, and absolutely nothing about the ones he inherited. Fortunately, the animals had...
Originally posted on October 14, 2005 Even though horses are big, strong animals, their legs are surprisingly delicate. The muscles and tendons that make up the legs can get injured quite easily. Your horse might stumble and cut his front...
It’s not hard for both you and your horse to work up a sweat while you’re riding. A horse’s body temperature is 99 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. As he exercises during your ride, his body temperature increases—which is natural—but if...
Whether you were there to see his first wobbly steps or purchased your young horse as a weanling, your ultimate goal is a healthy equine partner for a lifetime. Although some things are beyond our control, fortunately there are many...
Q: Help! My horse came in from the field with a bunch of burrs stuck in his mane and tail. How can I remove them without using scissors? A: Burrs tangled in your horse’s mane, tail and forelock can be...
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