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Home Horse Care Dental Care

Dental Care

Could dental pain be the culprit for your horse’s behavioral problems? A recent study done by researchers at the University of Helsinki in Finland that was published in the Journal of Equine Veterinary Science established a link between common...
Being herbivores, horses rely on eating large amounts of fibrous vegetation throughout the day to keep their digestive systems healthy and their body weight on target. The mechanical means by which your horse tears and grinds hay, grass, and...
As veterinarians, there are always those horses we’ll never forget. For me, when it comes to dentistry, there are four.The first is Shiloh. During my second year out of vet school, the old, beloved mare couldn’t eat for two...
By Henrietta Coole, Equine GuelphWith winter around the corner, now is the time for a dental check-up and nutritional status assessment, especially for older horses. Compared to spring and summer, horses burn significantly more calories through fall and winter...
After treatment for EOTRH, owner Kym Langevin says that Peanut has never been better.  Peanut is my 13-year-old Quarter Horse/Thoroughbred gelding that I consider my third child. I purchased Peanut from my farrier when I was eight and a half...
Throughout 2015, Dr. Lydia Gray answers your horse health questions. Q: I've always heard that floating is necessary because unfloated teeth can interfere with the bit. I only ride my horse in a bitless bridle. Does that mean he doesn't...
For the average horse with normal tooth development and regular oral exams, dental care is generally straightforward. Sharp enamel points are reduced, the mechanics of the mouth are evaluated and maintained, and considerations are made for performance horses (e.g....
Just as with human children, regular dental care is important in young and growing horses. Proper attention to your horse’s teeth in his early years is important because the equine dentist can discover any potential for problems and address...
Points, hooks, waves and ramps…they may not sound connected, but all four are common abnormalities that equine dentists regularly address in their four-legged patients.These issues are corrected in a routine process known as "floating” (also known as "equilibrating”)...
Last year during Wally’s annual teeth floating, my vet Jennifer stopped midway, turned to me and said, “This is it. I’m not equipped to address all the problems with Wally’s teeth.”Imagining the worst, I thought, “What does he need?...
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