Exercise

0
633

Exercise
In general, horses that are properly fed are more likely to be too fat than too thin. If you have a healthy but overweight “couch potato” horse that is just fed hay and/or a reasonable amount of pasture (i.e., no grain), it’s time to increase the exercise regimen to get him to a healthy body condition. As with humans, a good diet should always be combined with reasonable exercise to promote the best possible health.

Back to Horse Health Glossary

Back to Equine Nutrition A to Z


This article originally appeared in the 2010 issue of Horses USA. Click here to purchase a copy.

Subscribe now

Previous articleDigestion
Next articleEquine veterinary organizations speak out against soring
Holly Caccamise
Holly Caccamise has been with Horse Illustrated and Young Rider since 2007, and in August 2019, she took over as head editor. She’s been instrumental in the production of both magazines and helped Horse Illustrated win a 2018 American Horse Publications Media Award in the General Excellence Self-Supported Publication (circulation 15,000 and over) category. Before getting involved in the editorial side of print media, she worked as an award-winning ad copywriter for Thoroughbred Times magazine. Caccamise has her MS in Animal Science from the University of Kentucky, where she studied equine nutrition and exercise physiology, and her Bachelor’s from UCLA in Biology. Caccamise has also worked as a research assistant, horse camp counselor teaching riding and vaulting, and as a top-level show groom in the eventing world, where she continues to compete her horse, Artie, at the lower levels.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here