Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn?

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    I realize most of you think that us horse folk in Southern California—indeed in much of the southwest—are a bunch of wintertime wusses. You’re skidding around on frozen tundra on your way out to wave at your horses and we’re wringing our hands over some rain. But in our defense, it’s been raining a lot. And it’s dang cold. Yes, I know that elsewhere in the country January temps in the 50s are considered downright tropical. But for us? We’re bundled up in three layers of fleece and scavenging the aisles of our local Target for mittens.

    All of this winter wetness leaves me no choice but to resort to my favorite idle time occupation: composing horsey haikus. For those of you unfamiliar with haiku, it’s a Japanese form of expression consisting of three lines of descriptive prose. The first and third lines contain 5 syllables; the middle line, 7. Armed with my trusty camera, I ventured outside (between downpours and wind gusts) for some inspiration. I found it among simple, everyday barn stuff as well as in the way rain transforms my life.

    Life with Horses - Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn? 

    Wally’s Treasure

    Praise for blue bucket
    First savor treats brought my way
    Then chew on rope handle.

    Life with Horses - Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn? 

    Lethal

    Sharp hand extensions
    Potential for barn mayhem
    (Or pirate costume).

    Life with Horses - Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn? 

    Mud

    Rainwater in pen
    Recalls primordial ooze
    But with pungent smell.

    Life with Horses - Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn? 

    Shelter

    Warm, dry, cozy stall
    Posh horse condo with great view
    Includes room service.

    Life with Horses - Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn? 

    Aloof

    Rain brings benefits:
    More time for meditation
    Less time with humans.

    Life with Horses - Who Let the Haikus Out of the Barn? 

    Flirtation

    Wet weather fashion
    Like birka for horsewoman
    This screams sex appeal.

    See? Something to do during inclement weather besides clean tack. Or, God forbid, do housework. Just grab a pen and annoy your friends, family and barn buddies with your own bad poetry! It’ll help pass the time until the ground thaws and the puddles evaporate.

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    11 COMMENTS

    1. Sounds like Florida in the winter minus the rain (usually).It got cold and it froze several times. Then on new years day it SNOWED in Florida!! Wish i’d had my camera. I could try a poem but i’d probbably get arrested by the poetry police!!

    2. If we get snow it just dusts the ground but it’s still very cold, especially if the wind blows. Then we don’t ride either.

    3. GLAD YOU LIKE THE HAIKUS. YOU’D THINK THAT SPENDING YEARS IN COLLEGE AS AN ENGLISH MAJOR AND AS A HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHER THAT I COULD COMPOSE DECENT POETRY BUT NO. IT’S ALL HORSE-RELATED HAIKUS OR LIMERICKS. BUT AT LEAST IT’S GOOD FOR A LAUGH!

    4. those were so fun to read! and no offense but yes, i do think u r winter wusses 50 degrees in january? we’re lucky if it reaches 20! it can get down to below 0!

    5. I didn’t even finish reading your hilarious haikus before I glare meanly at you Californians. You have that right- 50 degrees in January is paradise to me here in Wisconsin! I was actually about to ride in a hoodie and walk my horse around outside! Anyway, your poetic skills are absolutely fantastic. Thanks for the laughs!

    6. I am a haiku lover and these are great.
      here’s one –
      locked in the stable
      sheltered from the cold and rain
      can’t wait to run free
      also, can you please explain this old idiom for me. “The stable wears out a horse more than a road.” What is it really saying about life.

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